Olde World Stone and Tile Molds
Weights, Measures, and Formulas Used When Working With Concrete and Cement

LINEAR CONVERSION FROM ENGLISH TO METRIC:
WHEN YOU KNOW.........MULTIPLY BY...........TO FIND

INCHES.......................... 25.4..........................MILLIMETERS
INCHES.......................... 2.54..........................CENTIMETERS
FEET..............................30.5..........................CENTIMETERS
YARDS............................0.91..........................METERS
MILES.............................1.61......................... KILOMETERS

METRIC AND ENGLISH UNITS OF MEASURE:
METRIC UNITS:
 
MILLA = 1/1000 - CENTI = 1/100 - KILO = 1,000 - MEGA = 1,000,000

ENGLISH UNITS: 
12 INCHES = 1 FOOT
3 FEET = 1 YARD
5,280 FEET = 1 MILE
144 SQUARE INCHES = 1 SQUARE FOOT
9 SQUARE FEET = 1 SQUARE YARD
1728 CUBIC INCHES = 1 CUBIC FOOT
27 CUBIC FEET = 1 CUBIC YARD
8 FLUID OUNCES = 1 PINT
2 CUPS = 1 PINT
2 PINTS = 1 QUART
4 QUARTS = 1 GALLON
1 GALLON = 231 CUBIC INCHES
1 CUBIC YARD = 202 GALLONS
7.48 GALLONS = 1 CUBIC FOOT

LINEAR CONVERSION FROM METRIC TO ENGLISH:
WHEN YOU KNOW.........MULTIPLY BY..........TO FIND
MILLIMETERS..................0.039.......................INCHES
CENTIMETERS.................0.39.........................INCHES
METERS..........................3.28.........................FEET
METERS..........................1.09.........................YARDS
KILOMETERS...................0.62.........................MILES 

AREA CONVERSION FROM ENGLISH TO METRIC:
WHEN YOU KNOW.........MULTIPLY BY.......TO FIND
SQUARE INCHES...........6.452....................SQUARE CENTIMETERS
SQUARE FEET...............0.092....................SQUARE METERS
SQUARE YARDS............0.836....................SQUARE METERS
SQUARE MILES..............2.59......................SQUARE KILOMETERS

AREA CONVERSION FROM METRIC TO ENGLISH:
WHEN YOU KNOW..............MULTIPLY BY......TO FIND
SQUARE CENTIMETERS......0.155...................SQUARE INCHES
SQUARE METERS...............1.196...................SQUARE YARDS
SQUARE KILOMETERS........0.386...................SQUARE MILES
VOLUME CONVERSIONS FROM ENGLISH TO METRIC:
WHEN YOU KNOW.............MULTIPLY BY........TO FIND
CUBIC INCHES...................16.0........................MILLILITRES
FLUID OUNCES..................29.6........................MILLILITRES
CUPS.................................0.24........................LITERS
PINTS.................................0.473......................LITERS
QUARTS.............................0.946......................LITERS
GALLONS...........................3.791......................LITERS
CUBIC FEET.......................0.028......................CUBIC METERS
CUBIC YARDS....................0.76........................CUBIC METERS
CUBIC FEET.......................28.3.........................LITRES
CUBIC YARDS....................764.5.......................LITRES
VOLUME CONVERSIONS FROM METRIC TO ENGLISH:
WHEN YOU KNOW............MULTIPLY BY...........TO FIND
MILLILITRES.......................0.06.........................CUBIC INCHES
MILLILITRES.......................0.03.........................FLUID OUNCES
LITRES...............................0.036.......................CUBIC FEET
LITRES...............................2.1...........................PINTS
LITRES...............................1.06.........................QUARTS
LITRES...............................0.26.........................GALLONS
CUBIC METERS..................35.3.........................CUBIC FEET
CUBIC METERS..................1.31.........................CUBIC YARDS

WEIGHT CONVERSIONS FROM ENGLISH TO METRIC:
WHEN YOU KNOW...........MULTIPLY BY............TO FIND
OUNCES..........................28.3............................GRAMS
POUNDS..........................0.45............................KILOGRAMS
SHORT TONS...................0.91............................METRIC TON

QUICK CALCULATIONS:  There are 28.3 grams to the ounce, or 454 grams to a pound of Olde World Colorant.

WEIGHT CONVERSION FROM METRIC TO ENGLISH:
WHEN YOU KNOW..........MULTIPLY BY..............TO FIND
GRAMS...........................0.035...........................OUNCES
KILOGRAMS....................2.2..............................POUNDS
METRIC TONS..................1.1.............................SHORT TONS

QUICK CALCULATIONS:  100 grams of colorant = 3.5 ounces.

COVERAGE OF COATINGS APPLIED AT VARIOUS MILLAGES:
THICKNESS OF COATING APPLIED........WET MIL COVERAGE PER U.S. GALLON
(1000 MILS = 1 INCH)

1/4 INCH = 250 MILS.................................6.4 SQ. FT.
3/16 INCH = 187.5 MILS............................8.5 SQ. FT.
1/8 INCH = 125 MILS................................12.8 SQ. FT.
= 100 MILS..............................................16.0 SQ. FT
1/16 INCH = 62.5 MILS.............................25.5 SQ. FT
= 50 MILS................................................32.0 SQ. FT.
1/32 INCH = 31.5 MILS..............................51.0 SQ. FT.
= 20 MILS.................................................80.0 SQ. FT.
1/64 INCH = 15.6 MILS..............................102.0 SQ. FT.
= 10 MILS................................................160.0 SQ. FT.
= 5 MILS..................................................320.0 SQ. FT.
= 1 MIL....................................................1600.0 SQ. FT.
CIRCLE:
AREA = SQUARE OF RADIUS X 3.1416 or SQUARE OF DIAMETER X 0.7854
CIRCUMFERENCE = DIAMETER X 3.1416
DIAMETER = CIRCUMFERENCE X .3183
SQUARE:
AREA = SQUARE OF SIDE or (Side X Side)
DIAGONAL = SIDE X 1.4142
SIDE = DIAGONAL X 0.7071

RECTANGLE:
AREA = LENGTH X WIDTH
DIAGONAL = SQUARE ROOT OF SUM OF SQUARES OF WIDTH AND LENGTH

TRIANGLE:
AREA = BASE X 1/2 OF PERPENDICULAR HEIGHTS
AREA OF SURFACE = SQUARE OF SIDE X 6
VOLUME = CUBE OF SIDE
DIAGONAL = SIDE X 1.732 
CYLINDER:
AREA OF CURVED SURFACE = DIAMETER X LENGTH X 3.1416
VOLUME = SQUARE OF (DIAMETER X LENGTH) X 0.7854

JOINT FILLER - LINEAR FEET PER U.S. GALLON:
DEPTH...x...WIDTH =....1/4"...........1/2"..........3/4"..........1"...........1-1/4"...........1-1/2"
1/4"..............................308.0
1/2"..............................154.0.........77.0
3/4"..............................102.7.........51.3.........34.2
1".................................77.0..........38.5..........25.7.........19.3
1-1/4"............................61.6.........30.8..........20.5..........15.4..........12.3
1-1/2"............................51.3.........25.7..........17.1..........12.8..........10.3..............8.6
1-3/4"............................44.0.........22.0..........14.7..........11.0..........8.8................7.3
2".................................38.5..........19.3..........12.8..........9.6............7.7................6.4
2-1/2"............................30.8..........15.4..........10.3..........7.7............6.2................5.1
3"..................................25.7.........12.8...........8.6............6.4...........5.1................4.3
Note:  This chart is provided to assist in estimating material requirements and is not intended to endorse any shape
or configuration expressed therein.

 

HOW MUCH STONE OR TILE CAN I MAKE WITH A 94 LB. BAG OF PORTLAND CEMENT?
If you use our formula for making tile using Portland cement, you can expect to get a yield of 86 square feet, or 86 tiles that are 12"x12"x1/2" in size.  Since there are a number of variables... like the thickness over or under the 1/2" that you pour the tiles, and the viscosity of the mix, (should you not follow directions exactly), you may end up with a difference of a couple of tiles more or less than the 86 standard.  Actually, the perfect mix and fill will yield 85 tiles that are 12"x12"x1/2", but "even" numbers are easier to work with when offering the examples below. 

BATCHING WARNING SIGNS: If you end up with 90 or more tiles, or 80 or less tiles, and you are using a 94 lb. bag of Portland in your base formula... there is a problem.  Ninety tiles or more probably indicate that your mix is too thin, or you are pouring the tiles too thin.  If you end up with 80 or less tiles, the mix is too thick, or you are pouring the tiles too thick, (over 1/2" - 5/8"). 

Another possibility, and one that may be more likely the cause, is that your raw materials measurements were off more than the standard.  You may have mixed in too much, or too little sand, aggregate, etc.  While not critical, unless you are "way" off, it is something to watch out for and take into consideration when mixing your next batch. 

CUBIC FOOT YIELD TO EXPECT FROM A 94 LB. BAG OF PORTLAND CEMENT:
Based on using our tile mix formula, and assuming that you are getting a yield of 86 tiles from each batch, you are getting a cubic concrete yield of 3.6 (3.583) cubic feet of concrete from each full batch. 

How did I come up with that figure?  The simplest way is to use a little mental visualization again. Assuming that you will get a yield of eighty-six (86) 12"x12"x1/2" tiles from each full batch using a 94 lb. bag of Portland cement, visualize this... To get one cubic foot of concrete, (12"x12"x12"), you would have to stack how many 12'x12"x1/2" tiles up?  Twenty-four, right?  So if you visualize a stack of eighty-six (86) tiles, neatly piled on top of each other, what would the volume of that "cube" be? 

86 (stacked tiles) DIVIDED BY 24 (the number of tiles to make one cubic foot) = 3.583 cubic feet yield from the mix. 

HOW DO I CALCULATE THE YIELD FOR ODD OR VARIABLY SIZED STONE?
Obviously, you cannot be "exact" as there are too many variables, like the thickness variables, the water content in the batch, the dry volume discrepancy in the mix when it is made, etc., etc.  But using the "base cubic yield" of a standard batch, you can come pretty close in estimating your yield and thus raw material needs.

We already know that all things being perfect, the yield of each full batch is 3.6 cubic feet (rounded) of mix, or 6221 cubic inches.  All you need do is estimate how many individual stones or tiles you can get from that, based on the area and thickness (cube) of each stone being poured. As an example, let's say that you have purchased a set of our Olde Appalachian Fieldstone molds.  Each sheet (or set) will cover an estimated seven square feet of area.  That number includes all of the grout, or mortar lines around each stone.  So let's say that the actual "stone" by itself, covers six square feet of area.  And let's say that you are pouring them to the full average thickness of 1.5" thick. You would multiply the full area covered (6 sq. ft.), by 144 to get the square inches (864), then again by the average thickness (1.5"), to get the cubic inch volume of stone being made from that one set.  That total is 1296 cubic inches. Now divide that number into the batch yield of 6221 cubic inches of concrete, and you see that you can fill 4.8 sheets of this particular style of stone with a full batch of concrete.  This yields coverage of about 33.6 square feet of stone coverage per batch.

You can use this same basic logic or formula to figure raw materials needed for almost any project.  As an example... if you had a wall that was 10'x10' = 100 square feet of area.  And you wanted to cover it with Olde Appalachian Fieldstone.  Using the above figures, you would need to purchase enough material to make three full batches of concrete... 33.6 X 3 = 100.8 sq. ft.

NOTE: IF YOU WERE USING JUST ONE SET OF MOLDS, YOU WOULD NEED TO MAKE A 20% BATCH SIZE SINCE A FULL BATCH WILL FILL ABOUT FIVE SETS (SHEETS) OF THIS STYLE OF MOLDS.     

HOW MANY TILES OR STONES CAN I MAKE WITH A BAG OF PREMIX CONCRETE?
Here's a simple way to figure out about how many tiles can be made with a certain size bag of premix concrete.  Let's say that the bag stated that .6 cubic feet of concrete could be made with the contents.  Looking at the above chart, we know that there are 1728 cubic inches to a cubic foot.  So .6 cubic feet would yield about 1037 cubic inches of concrete.  Let's say you were pouring a 12"x12"x1/2" thick tile.  Theoretically, you can make twenty-four (24) 12"x12"x1/2" tiles with one cubic foot of concrete. 

Here's the logic:  Picture a 12"x12"x12" block of concrete.  Now slice it into 1/2" thin slices, like you were slicing cheese. You get twenty-four 1/2" thick slices from a 12" thick block, right?.  Now go back to the .6 cubic foot premix bag of concrete.  Multiply 24 X .6 = 14.4 tiles.  Got the logic?  If the stone or tile were going to be 1" thick, you would get about seven from a bag. Simple, no?

Should you need molds or moulds, colorant, concrete sealer, stains, or other concrete, cement, or plaster supplies for your handyman or home improvement project, please visit our catalogue website at www.TheMoldStore.com or our shopping cart website at http://www.TheMoldStore.us  to get ideas.  If you are interested in starting a concrete stone and veneer, or concrete and cement paver, brick or tile business, visit our Olde World Stone & Tile Business Opportunity website at www.Oldeworld.com for full details, instructions and various stone making and other concrete product making packages.  We also offer D-I-Y Packages in our catalogue and on our shopping cart websites.

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